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Alumni of the Training Program

The following is a listing of CAAS alumni describing their background and research interests upon entering into the program and their current positions.

2012-2014 Abigail Polter received her Ph.D. in neurobiology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham where she investigated the role of intracellular signaling cascades in animal models of mood disorders. During her time at CAAS, she performed research on synapses in the brain's reward circuitry, and how these snyapses can be modulated by stress and drugs of abuse. Abby was recently awarded a NARSAD Young Investigator grant. She will be continuing her postdoctoral studies at Brown in the department of Molecular, Pharmacolgy, Physiology, and Biotechnology.

2012-2013 Allecia E. Reid received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2010 where she conducted research on the individual differences and intervention features that may moderate the effectiveness of norms-based alcohol risk reduction interventions, as well as the mediational mechanisms through which such interventions influence behavior. Dr. Reid is pursuing an R15 through NIAAA to study the influence of peer social networks on the efficacy of brief alcohol interventions for college students. Dr. Reid has accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Colby College.

2012-2013 Christopher P. Salas-Wright received his Ph.D. in Social Work from Boston College in 2012. He conducted research on the etiology and prevention of substance abuse and related risk behaviors among Latino adolescents in the United States and in Latin America. Dr. Salas-Wright has accepted a position as Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Austin's School of Social Work. Upon arrival at UT, he plans to submit a K01 to NIDA in order to pursue further training in the developmental and cultural adaptation of preventative interventions for substance use and sexual risk behavior with Hispanic adolescents.

2012-2013 Meenakshi Subbaraman received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkley in 2012. Her research focused on the causal mechanisms of behavioral and pharmaceutical treatments for alcoholism, causal inference approaches, and methods for direct/indirect effect estimation. Dr. Subbaraman is pursuing an R21 through NIAAA to study the effects of cannabis use on alcohol craving and use among individuals treated for alcohol use disorders. She will continue her postdoctoral studies at UC Berkeley for the 2013-14 academic year.

2011-2013 Jacques Gaume received his Ph.D. in Life Sciences from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland in 2011. He conducted research on data from a study specifically designed to measure the influence of counselor characteristics and behaviors during brief motivational interventions on alcohol use outcomes in young men. Dr. Gaume has returned to Switzerland to pursue addiction research as a "Maitre d'Enseignement et de Recherche" (equivalent to Assistant Professor) at the Alcohol Treatment Center at Lausanne University Hospital. His research plans include studying therapist behaviors influence on patient mechanisms of change in outpatients treatment for alcohol use disorder.

2011-2013 Matthew A. Maccani received his Ph.D. in Medical Sciences from Brown University in 2011 where he conducted research on exposure and fetal growth associated miRNA alterations in the human placenta. He has accepted a one-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University's Alpert Medical School. As a trainee on the Child Mental Health Research T32 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Dr. Maccani will continue his research under the mentorship of Dr. Valerie Knopik characterizing links between prenatal exposures and neurobehavioral outcomes in infants and children, with a special focus on translating his and other research findings into effective, scientifically-informed policy. Dr. Maccani also plans to continue his work as a technolgy screening and market research intern in the Technolgy Ventures Office at Brown in which he screens new inventions disclosed by university faculty, performs preliminary market and industry analysis for applications of new technologies, and writes marketing profiles for active technologies.

2011-2013 Kimberly H.M. O'Brien received her Ph.D. in Social Work from Boston College in 2011. She studied the temporal relationship between alcohol use and suicidality in adolescents, developing and testing a brief alcohol intervention for adolescents who have attempted suicide. Dr. O'Brien has accepted an Assistant Professor position at Simmons College School of Social Work. She will have a joint appointment as an Instructor at Harvard Medical School through Boston Children's Hospital, where she will conduct her research. She recently resubmitted an R21 to NIAAA to test a brief alcohol intervention with adolescents who have attempted suicide.

2011-2013 Daniel Rounsaville received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Maryland in 2010 where he studied the mechanisms of lapse and relapse in recovery with substance dependent and dually diagnosed individuals, and the telehealth interventions to prevent relapse. Dr. Rounsaville is pursuing a resubmission of his K23 Career Development Aware to conduct research on using mHealth interventions with recently released prisoners with substance dependence, as well as submitting as a Co-I on an R34 application to NIDA on the use of ACT based video conferencing intervention for individuals undergoing detoxification from opioids.

2011-2012 Katherine L. Kivisto received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, from the University of Tennessee in 2011. Her research focused on adolescent close relationships and emotion regulation as contexts for adolescent substance abuse, psychopathology, and preventative interventions. Dr. Kivisto is pursuing an R21 through NIAAA to study the effects of adolescent mood and distress tolerance on alcohol craving and use in the natural environment.  She accepted the position of Assistant Professor of Child Clinical Psychology at the University of Indianapolis School of Psychological Sciences.

2010-2013 Caitlin C. Abar received her Ph.D. in Human Development & Family Studies from Pennsylvania State University in 2010, where her interests were in the application of latent variable modeling to the examination of the relationship between parenting and adolescent/young adult substance use, measurement characteristics of parenting behaviors and the relationship between longitudinal trends in parenting and the developmental course of substance use. Dr. Abar has accepted a tenure track position as an Assistant Professor of Developmental Psychology at the State University of New York in Brockport. In addition to teaching developmental and statistical courses at the undergraduate and graduate level, she will continue her research on prospective influences of parenting on youth substance use.

2010-2013 Jordan M. Braciszewski received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Wayne State University in 2010 where he researched the prevention of substance use and chronic homelessness, using both community-based efforts and clinically-informed interventions. Dr. Braciszewski has accepted a position as an Associate Research Scientist at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. He is currently the Project Director for a NIDA-funded study of addiction, social connections, and HIV-risk behaviors. Jordan is also Principal Investigator of a NIDA-funded R34, which aims to develop and test a preventive intervention for foster youth who are using alcohol and other drugs.

2010-2013 Golfo K. Tzilos received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Wayne State University in 2010 where her research focused on adapting and implementing a computer-delivered approach to identify and treat women at risk for both alcohol use and intimate partner violence during pregancy. Dr. Tzilos will continue her work in adapting and implementing computer-delivered approaches to identify and intervene with underserved, high-risk populations. She recently received funding from NICHD for an R21 grant to test a computer-delivered brief intervention for HIV/STI risk and drug use during pregnancy. Dr. Tzilos has joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown Univesity with a joint appointment in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies.

2010-2012 L. Cinnamon Bidwell received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Genetics from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research broadly focuses on understanding the development and maintenance of mental disorders across the lifespan and investigates the links between genetic vulnerabilities, neuropsychological weaknesses and neurocognitive abnormalities, and a variety of psychiatric conditions, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, schizophrenia, and substance use. Dr. Bidwell was funded by NIDA to pursue a K23 Career Development Award to conduct research into the genetic and cognitive correlates of increased risk for smoking in adolescents with ADHD.  She has joined the faculty at the CAAS and works with her mentors at Lifespan, Brown, and Stanford Research Institute to conduct research and gain training in psychopharmacology, psychiatric genetics, and adolescent smoking.

2010-2012 Ashlee C. Carter received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL in 2010. Her program of research has focused on the convergence of alcohol expectancies, psychophysiological reactivity to affective picture cues, and risk for substance use disorders. Additionally, she has examined psychosocial factors that impact drinking trajectories among college students and their non-college peers. Dr. Carter accepted a staff psychologist position in the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder clinic at the Providence VA Medical Center, where she will specialize in working with recently deployed veterans diagnosed with PTSD and co-occurring conditions, including substance use disorders.

2010-2012 Elise M. Clerkin received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Virginia in 2010, where she focused on the research and treatment of anxiety and OC-spectrum disorders. While at CAAS, she synthesized her interests in anxiety with a new focus on alcohol use disorders. Elise began a faculty position in the psychology department at Miami University in 2012. She is currently the principal investigator of an NIAAA-funded R21 that she wrote and submitted during her CAAS fellowship. This award funds a study designed to test an experimental, Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) intervention among individuals with co-occurring alcohol dependence and social anxiety symptoms.

2010-2012 Caroline C. Kuo received her D.Phil. in Evidence-Based Social Policy from Oxford University in 2010 and her M.Phil in International Development, also from Oxford University. She is currently an Assistant Professor at CAAS and the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences. Her research focuses on developing and testing sustainable and scalable HIV and mental health interventions for vulnerable populations including families affected by AIDS-orphanhood, sex workers, and incarcerated women in South Africa, Mexico, and the United States.

2009-2012 Uraina S. Clark received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Boston University in 2007 after completing her predoctoral clinical internship at the Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. Broadly, Dr. Clark’s research interests are in understanding the behavioral and functional consequences of frontal-subcortical disruption. Her research has investigated neural and neuropsychological abnormalities associated with conditions that affect frontal-subcortical systems including alcoholism, stress, Parkinson's disease, HIV, and aging. Dr. Clark is an Assistant Professor in the Neurology Department at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

2009-2012 Anthony Comeau received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Brown University in 2009. His primary research focuses on small molecule development for the purpose of enzyme inhibition and development to the design and use of new pharmacotherapy for the cocaine use disorder. Dr. Comeau has accepted a Postdoc research fellowship with the Pharmacology Department at Brown University.

2009-2012 Jessica Nargiso received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Rhode Island in 2009. Her primary research interests are in examining the efficacy of multilevel substance abuse prevention and early interventions for adolescents, with a focus on family and community-based approaches. Additionally, Jessica has examined gender differences in risk for early initiation of alcohol use in adolescents. During her postdoctoral training, Jessica has focused on adapting preventive interventions to address tobacco-related health disparities among low-income communities. Currently, she is working as a Staff Psychologist, in Clinical Psychology and Addictions at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

2009-2011 Sara Becker received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Duke University and completed her clinical internship at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School in 2009. Her graduate work focused on patient perceptions of the effectiveness of evidence-based therapy for adolescent substance abuse (ASA). At CAAS, she developed a research and training plan to examine whether patient feedback could be used more effectively to market evidence-based therapy to adolescent substance abusers and their parents. Dr. Becker is currently the Principal Investigator of a 5-year K23 Career Development Award from NIDA to develop and evaluate direct-to-consumer marketing strategies for ASA. She is an Assistant Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University, and an Affiliate Faculty member of CAAS.

2009-2011 Lindsay Orchowski received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ohio University with a specialization in Applied Quantitative Psychology and a certificate in Women’s Studies in 2009. Her primary research interests are factors associated with violence against women, and the development of sexual assault prevention programs.  At the Center, she studied the role of alcohol as a risk factor for sexual assault. Dr. Orchowski has accepted a position as an Assistant Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She is currently the PI of a 3-year NIAAA-funded R34 Treatment Development grant aimed at developing and testing an integrated intervention that addresses alcohol use and sexual aggression among college men.

2009-2011 (pre-doctoral fellowship) Jason Ramirez received his MS in Experimental Psychology in 2010 from Brown University where he is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in the same field.  His thesis integrates field and experimental research to examine the effects of alcohol cue exposure on craving and attention in late adolescence. At the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, he worked on various projects aimed at identifying mechanisms of action underlying various pharmacotherapies for alcohol addiction.  Jason is in his final year of graduate studies at Brown University and is currently applying for postdoctoral research fellowships.

2009-2011 Margie R. Skeer received her Sc.D. in Social Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2009 and her M.S.W. and M.P.H. from Boston University in 2001 and 2003 respectively. Her primary research interests are in adolescent substance use disorders, with respect to epidemiology and prevention. Her prior work has focused on etiologic pathways by which adolescents develop substance use problems, examining specifically the associations between family- and neighborhood-level risk factors in childhood and the development of substance use disorders in adolescence. Her current work investigates the effects of brief interventions with parents as a means to prevent substance abuse and sexual risk behavior among adolescents, with a specific focus on family meals. She has taken a position as Assistant Professor at the Tufts University School of Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine.

2009-2011 Kristen Underhill received her D.Phil. in Evidence-based Social Intervention from Oxford, England in 2007.  Her primary research interests are in the behavioral prevention of HIV, particularly the behavioral aspects of biomedical interventions such as antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis.  Her past research has focused on systematic reviewing, abstinence-based programs for HIV prevention among adolescents, the social context of HIV risk among sexual minorities, and HIV prevention in criminal justice settings.  She has accepted a position as Associate Research Scientist/Scholar at Yale, with affiliations at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS and Yale Law School.

2009-2010 Marlene Chait received her Ed.D. in Transition Special Education with a concentration in Disability Studies from The George Washington University, in Washington, D.C., in 2007. Her exploratory study, combining quantitative and qualitative methodology, looked at women with disabilities, and their experience with, and attitudes toward personal care, sexuality education and sexual expression. Although an issue largely unrecognized and a population little served, women veterans often experience similar isolation and abuse, and additionally suffer addiction. Marlene's present research will be used to determine a policy initiative to benefit women veterans and their loved ones as they transition from tours in Iraq, Afghanistan and other parts of the world. Additionally, Marlene is collaborating with Women Veteran organizations and Veteran’s Medical Centers in research, investigating why some women veterans returning from combat zones are able to achieve recovery from addiction and other women veterans cannot achieve recovery. Dr. Chait is currently President of Mc Consulting Inc.,Educational Consultants in Philadelphia, PA.

2009-2010 Richard Mulligan received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in 2007. His primary research interests are in the use of fMRI to assess how addiction to tobacco is related to dysfunction of fronto-striatal systems across the lifespan. His prior work has investigated the neural substrate of inhibitory control in adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. This year, he is conducting programmatic research investigating how genetic variations in the dopaminergic system impact the neural system supporting inhibitory control, and how these effects are in turn related to disinhibited and addictive behaviors. He is currently in the process of writing an R01 application to conduct a randomized, placebo-controlled fMRI study in which genetic variations in the dopamine pathway and the neural substrate of inhibitory control are assessed in smokers on and off nicotine. Dr. Mulligan is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis.

2008-2010 Nadine Mastroleo received her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from The Pennsylvania State University in 2008. Her research interests include college student alcohol use, peer counseling interventions aimed at high risk college student drinking populations, and counselor training approaches in brief, empirically supported treatments. In addition, she seeks to investigate student-athlete drinking behaviors and prevention and intervention approaches aimed at this population. Dr. Mastroleo is an Assistant Professor at CAAS, and in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences.

2007-2009 Christy Capone received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Rhode Island in 2007. Her primary research interests are in behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for alcohol use disorders, etiological risk factors (e.g. familial alcoholism) for alcohol dependence, and the application of advanced statistical modeling techniques. She joined the PTSD clinic where she is working with patients with comorbid PTSD and substance abuse disorders. Christy’s research will continue to focus on pharmacological and behavioral treatments for co-occurring disorders. Dr. Capone is currently at the VAMC, as Staff Psychologist and pending Assistant Professor at Brown.

2007-2009 Travis Cook received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology in 2007. His primary research interest is in the use of mindfulness and distress tolerance techniques to improve the efficacy of treatment for substance use disorders. He is currently Clinical Director, Intensive Alcohol and Drug Addiction Program, VA Boston Healthcare System.

2007-2009 John Hayes received his Ph.D. in Nutrition and a certificate in Quantitative Research Methods (Psychology) from the University of Connecticut in 2007. His research interestes revolve around the psychobiology of ingestive behavior. His prior work focused on how oral sensory phenotypes relate to differences in the sensations from foods and beverages, and how these differences may drive liking, and ultimately, intake. John is currently an Assistant Professor of Food Science at the Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania.

2007-2009 Lynn Hernandez received her Ph.D. in Life-Span Developmental Psychology from Florida International University in 2007. Her primary research interests focus on understanding the roles psychosocial developmental variables and cultural factors play in adolescents’ substance use trajectories. She is also interested in understanding how such variables moderate treatment outcomes in order to examine the developmental and cultural appropriateness of interventions for adolescents. As a postdoctoral fellow she is interested in making cultural adaptations to an intervention for substance using Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Dr. Hernandez is currently an Assistant Professor at CAAS and in the Brown Medical School.

2007-2009 Bettina Hoeppner received her Ph.D. in experimental Psychology in 2007 and her M.S. in Statistics in 2005, both from the University of Rhode Island. During her graduate training, she collaborated on numerous population-based health behavior change projects at the Cancer Prevention Research Center at URI. During this time, she focused on using advanced longitudinal methodology in understanding and documenting addictive behavior and its change, including both nomothetic and idiographic approaches. During her postdoctoral fellowship, she has become increasingly interested in the fine-grained patterns of substance use, particularly in adolescents and young adults. Dr. Hoeppner is currently an Assistant Professor and Director of Biostatistics, Harvard Center for Addictive Medicine at MGH.

2007-2009 Adam Leventhal received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University of Houston in 2007. His primary research interest is in affective and motivational processes underlying addiction.  His work integrates clinical, cognitive, and physiological psychology approaches to understand the etiology of drug use motivation, with a specific focus on nicotine and stimulant use disorders.  Adam is currently an Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine.

2007-2009 Molly Magill received her Ph.D. in Social Work Research from Boston College in 2007. Her primary research area is treatment process in psychosocial intervention with adult substance use disorders. Molly has a particular interest in examining mechanisms of action in evidence-gased treatments, and distinguishing elements of treatment process that are model specific from those that are common to intervention with substance using populations. As a postdoctoral fellow, Molly focused on measurement of alcohol treatment process through observational coding systems. Dr. Magill is now an Assistant Professor at CAAS and in the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences.

2007-2009 Kristen Stone received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, in 2007. Kristen is interested in the causal relationships between sleep problems and addiction to cocaine and other drugs. Kristen is currently an independent clinical researcher at the Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk, which is a division of the Pediatrics Department of Women & Infants Hospital. Dr. Stone is the principal investigator of an NIH grant-funded investigation on postpartum sleep effects on smoking relapse. Her research will continue to focus on clarifying the link between drug addiction and sleep problems for the promotion of optimal health and well-being for individuals and families. Dr. Stone is currently an Assistant Professor (Research) at Brown Medical School.

2007-2009 Lara Ray received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2007, after completing her predoctoral clinical internship at the Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. During her graduate training, Dr. Ray completed a graduate program in behavioral genetics through the Institute for Behavioral Geneitcs at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Ray's program of research focuses on psychosocial and genetic factors underlying the risk for the development of substance use disorders by focusing primarily on alcohol endophenotypes. Dr. Ray is especially interested in applying human laboratory paradigms, such as alcohol administration and cue-exposure, to examine the biobehavioral mechanisms of action of novel pharmacotherapies for alcoholism and to evaluate the role of genetic factors in determining who responds to a given pharmacotherpay and by which mechanisms. Dr. Ray is an Assistant Professor at UCLA.

2006-2009 John Hustad received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Syracuse University in 2006. His research interests include college student alcohol use, empirically supported treatments, behavioral economics, and biological markers of alcohol use. John is currently Assistant Professor (tenure-track) at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and the Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Health Services Research.  He will continue to research web-based interventions for college students, mechanisms of behavioral change, and predictors of high-risk consumption.

2006-2009 Leila Tarokh received her Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in Cognitive Neuroscience from the University of California, Irvine in March 2006. Her primary research interest is in the use neuroimaging techniques, such as electroencephalograph (EEG), to study the effect of alcohol use on both sleep and waking states.  She is also interested in the impact that a parental history of alcohol abuse has on sleep and cortical function of children and adolescents. She continues her work examining sleep and development in children and adolescents with a history of parental alcohol abuse/dependence with Dr. Mary Carskadon at Brown University. Leila will also be a visiting fellow at the University of Zurich in Switzerland and collaborate with Dr. Peter Achermann on modeling of developmental changes in the sleep EEG. Dr. Tarokh is currently at Brown, as an Instructor (Research).

2006-2008 Christopher AhnAllen received his in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2006. His research interests include the examination of how neuropsychological factors, including attention, interact with cigarette smoking behavior and nicotine levels in psychiatric populations. Primarily, he is invested in understanding the relationship between cigarette smoking behavior and persons with serious mental illness, namely schizophrenia spectrum disorders.  Dr. AhnAllen is currently a Clinical Psychologist, VA Boston Healthcare System.

2006-2008 Lance Swenson received his Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2006. His primary research interests involve the influences of adolescents' social relationships on the development of maladaptive behavior (e.g., suicidality, substance use).  Dr. Swenson is an Assistant Professor, Suffolk University.

2006-2007 Kristina Phillips received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University in 2005. Her primary research interests focus on medical consequences associated with injection drug use (e.g. bacterial infections, HIV), intervention development, and treatment outcome research. Dr. Phillips was recently the principal investigator on a NIDA-funded R21 that tested a risk reduction intervention for injection drug users in Denver. She continues to collaborate with Michael Stein, MD, at Butler Hospital on a new RCT of this intervention among hospitalized injectors in Boston. A second line of Dr. Phillips' research uses ecological monetary assessment (EMA) to assess marijuana use, craving, and academic motivation among college student marijuana users. Dr. Phillips is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Northern Colorado.

2006-2007 Tara White received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from Cornell University in 1998. Her research interests include individual differences in fMRI responses to alcohol, during the ascending and descending limbs of the response curve. Dr. White is currently an Assistant Professor (Research) at Brown.

2005-2007 George Kenna received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology in 2003 and B.S. in Pharmacy in 1975, both from the University of Rhode Island. His primary interest is in single drug and more complex pharmacotherapy trials for alcoholism, and translating findings of clinical efficacy trials to a more heterogeneous population of alcohol dependent patients. He is also interested in identifying risk factors that contribute to substance use and abuse by healthcare professionals and educating healthcare professionals on the addiction process. Dr. Kenna is currently an Assistant Professor (Research) Brown Medical School and Assistant Director, Opioid Risk Management Tufts Healthcare Institute Clinical Pharmacist, Westerly Hospital. 

2005-2007 Laura MacPherson received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology in 2005. Her primary research interests include a developmentally-informed examination of the progression and cessation of addictive behaviors among adolescents and young adults to inprove youth-tailored interventions, as well as developing behavioral treatments for adult smokers with psychiatric comorbidities. She also conducts work in appetitive and avoidance-based processes underlying adolescent risk-taking. As a postdoctoral fellow, she was involved in a study of MI for substance use among adolescents hospitalized for psychiatric comorbidity and wrote a NIDA-funded K23 award to examine the role of distress tolerance in adolescent smoking cessation. Dr. MacPherson is currently a Associate Professor at the University of Maryland and a faculty member in the clinical psychology doctoral program. She is also Associate Director of the UMD Center for Addictions, Personality, and Emotion Research (CAPER).

2005-2006 James MacKillop received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 2005. His research interests are the application of modern learning theory to addictive behavior. In the past, this has included laboratory studies on the effect of cognitive manipulations on alcohol cue reactivity, methods to reduce human context-dependent learning, and the application of behavioral economics to basic and applied addictive phenomena. At the Center, he applied these methods to understanding the mechanisms and efficacy of clinical approaches to substance dependence. Dr. MacKillop has accepted a position as an Associate Project Director within the CAAS. He will continue to work on an NIAAA-funded project examining the biobehavioral effects of topiramate on alcohol use. In addition, he will continue to conduct research using modern learning theory to understand and treat alcohol misuse and other forms of addictive behavior. Dr. MacKillop is currently an Assistant Professor, University of Georgia.

2005-2006 Meghan McDevitt-Murphy received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Auburn University in 2004. Her graduate research focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She will continue her research investigating relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder and substance abuse and developing psychosocial treatment approaches for co-occurring PTSD and substance abuse. Dr. McDevitt-Murphy is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Memphis.

2004-2007 Sara Dolan received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Iowa in 2004. Her primary research interest is neuropsychological function in persons with substance use disorders. Dr. Dolan accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Baylor University.  As a postdoctoral fellow she investigated the etiological significance of executive dysfunction in addiction.  She also explored how neuropsychological function impacts substance abuse treatment process and outcome. Dr. Dolan is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University.

2004-2007 Jane Metrik received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology in 2004. Her primary research interests are the expectancy models of alcohol and drug use.  She has studied alcohol expectancies involved in cessation from drinking and now plans to explore marijuana expectancies and particularly their influence on impulsivity and risk taking among youth.  Dr. Metrik is currently an Assistant Professor (Research) at Brown.

2004-2006 Alicia Justus received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Indiana University in 2004. She will remain at the CAAS, as Project Director on Dr. Robert Miranda's NIDA funded R21 investigating mechanisms relating conduct disorder and adolescent substance abuse. She also is currently awaiting a funding decision on her own R21, which she hopes to begin during the next year. This study will focus on the relationship between individual differences in responsiveness to contingency cues and drug related problems in adolescents. Dr. Justus is currently an Assistant Professor (Research), at Brown Medical School.

2004-2006 John Kelly received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University of California, San Diego/San Diego State. He is the Elizabeth R. Spallin Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, the founder and Director of the Recovery Research Institute at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), the Program Director of the Addiction Recovery Management Service (ARMS) and the Associate Director of the Center for Addiction Medicine at MGH. Dr. Kelly is President of the American Psychology Association (APA) Society of Addiction Psychology, and is also a Fellow of APA. His clinical and research work has focused on addiction treatment and the recovery process which has included specific research on the effectiveness of mutual-help groups, such as Alcohoilcs Anonymous, as adjuncts to formal care, the translation and implementation of evidence-based practice, addiction and criminal justice, addiction treatment theories and mechanisms of behavior change, and reducing stigma associated with addiction.

2004-2006 Heather LaChance received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of Colorado/Boulder. An Assistant Professor/Acting Director Chief at National Jewish Health/University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, she completed an R01 investigating Behavioral Couples Therapy (BCT) for smoking cessation. Her interests include innovative intervention development and mediators/moderators of treatment outcome for individuals and couples. She is currently in private practice in Denver, CO.

2004-2006 John McGeary, Ph.D. received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology/Neuroscience from the University of Colorado in 2003. His primary research interest is the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of addictive behaviors, particularly problematic alcohol consumption. His VA-funded Research Career Development award will examine the association of genetic variation in the neuropeptide Y gene and alcohol use. His other work involves addiction pharmacogenetics and the development of addiction-related endophenotypes for candidate gene association studies. Dr. McGeary is currently a Research Psychologist at the Providence VA and an Assistant Professor at Brown.

2004-2006 Jeffrey Meehan received his Ph.D. in clinical science and social cognitive neuroscience from Indiana University in 2004. His primary interest is in developing cognitive and neurobiological models to help explain the development of intimate relationship aggression. While a postdoctoral fellow, he plans to study the effect of alcohol consumption on behavioral and neurobiological processes suspected to be precursors to aggression and to examine the efficacy of a brief alcohol intervention in reducing alcohol use and violent recidivism in a sample of court-referred batterers. Dr. Meehan is currently an Assistant Project Director at Brown.

2004-2006 James Murphy received his Ph.D. from Auburn University. Dr. Murphy is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at the University of Memphis. He has conducted numerous clinical trials of brief motivational interventions for college student drinkers. He has also developed and evaluated a novel behavioral economic supplement to brief motivational interventions that attempts to increase students' engagement in constructive alternatives to drinking. His research also explores novel behavioral economic predictors of substance abuse problem severity, treatment outcome, and mechanisms of behavior change. Dr. Murphy's research has been funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Alcohol Research Foundation (ABMRF). He is currently an assistant editor for the journal Addiction and a consulting editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, and Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

2004-2006 C. Teal Pedlow received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Syracuse University in 2004. Her research interests include HIV/STD prevention in adolescent and young women, co-occurrence of alcohol/substance abuse and sexual risk behaviors, the design of developmentally appropriate risk reduction interventions, and delivery of interventions in medical settings. Dr. Pedlow is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychology at University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth where she will help to develop a new Ph.D. program in Health Psychology. She also will continue her research examining co-occurrence of alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors and designing HIV/STI prevention interventions for young women.

2004-2006 Daniel Squires received both a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and a M.P.H. from the University of New Mexico. His interests revolve around transdisciplinary approaches to the prevention and treatment of substance misuse, and the dissemination of evidence-based interventions. Dr. Squires is currently Investigator and Director of the Addiction Technology Tranfer Center of New England within the CAAS. As Director of the ATTC-NE, he will work closely with the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment to advance improvements for addiction treatment across the six New England states. In addition, he will continue to pursue his developing program of NIH research concerning the identification and testing of training and organizational change strategies intended to enhance the adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices for substance abuse.

2004-2005 Darci Nielsen received her Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Neuroscience from Albany Medical College in 1998. Dr. Nielsen's interests include basic science studies relating to behavioral neuropharmacology of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and comorbid substance abuse. Dr. Nielsen is currently a Research Scientist, at SPDP Foundation.

2003-2005 Timothy Apodaca received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of New Mexico in 2003. He was awarded a K23 to develop expertise in therapeutic mechanisms of change for motivational interviewing (MI), and a subsequent R01 to study MI process among college student drinkers. He is currently an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, and Research Director for the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansad City, Missouri. A member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers since 2002, he has trained a range of clinicians in this therapeutic approach in settings throughout the country, and is currently a co-investigator on several NIH grants.

2003-2005 Brian Borsari received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Syracuse University in New York in 2003. He is currently an Assistant Professor (Research) Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies (CAAS) at Brown University. He has published over 35 articles on a variety of areas, including the development and implementation of brief interventions with college student drinkers, the assessment and practical application of social norms on college campuses, the role of drinking games in risky drinking on campus, and social influences on alcohol. Dr. Borsari is also the principal investigator on a 5-year project funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism that implements adaptive treatment strategies with college students who have been referred for alcohol violations, as well as a 4-year funded project (by NIAAA) to identify in-session processes that are related to subsequent behavior change. Dr. Borsari is also a researcher/clinician at the Providence VAMC PTSD clinic. In this role, he has developed a research program examining interventions to improve sleep in veterans with PTSD, strategies of monitoring OIF/OEF veterans to encourage engagement in treatment for substance use (including smoking) and PTSD, and the use of virtual reality to treat PTSD in veterans. .

2002-2005 Kimberly Leite-Morris received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Rhode Island in 2002. Her primary interest is in brain chemistry and circuitry that underlies the behavior leading to addiction. Her dissertation examined the effects of intra-VTA (ventral tegmental area) injection of a GABAB receptor agonist, on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and Fos protein expression in the nucleus accumbens. During her first year as a postdoctoral fellow at the CAAS Dr. Leite-Morris developed a model of ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization and is currently investigating whether intra-VTA injections of a GABAB receptor agonist will block ethanol-induced sensitization. In addition, she is examining whether GABA drugs will alter dopamine levels in the brain (via in vivo microdialysis) during ethanol seeking and consumption. Activation of GABA receptors may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of alcohol addiction. Dr. Leite-Morris is currently an Assistant Professor at Boston University.

 

2002 - 2004 Ana Abrantes received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology in 2002. Her interests include the comorbidity of substance use disorders and psychopathology among adolescent populations. As a postdoctoral fellow, she plans to explore the temporal sequencing of disorders, the relationship between specific psychiatric disorders and severity and type of substance involvement, and treatment outcomes among comorbid adolescents. Dr. Abrantes is currently an Assistant Professor at Brown University, and Research Associate at Butler Hospital.

2002- 2004 Chad Gwaltney received his Ph.D. in Clinical/Health Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh in 2002. His primary research interest is the process of relapse following an attempt to abstain from substance use, particularly cigarette smoking. To date, Chad's research has focused on how social-cognitive variables - self-efficacy and the expected effects of smoking - influence relapse. He is also interested in the development and application of novel assessment methods, including Ecological Momentary Assessment. Dr. Gwaltney is currently Assistant Professor (Research) at the Brown Medical School.

2002 - 2004 Christina Lee received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from New York University. Her primary areas of interest are: how clinician and patient characteristics interact to influence health outcomes such as diagnosis or patient compliance, clinician training to improve identification rates and treatment, examining interventions to reduce stereotyping in the treatment of substance abuse, and to identify the factors that reduce barriers to treatment for substance abuse. A related research interest is to evaluate the role of social factors as they mediate the relationship between ethnic minority status and substance abuse in adolescents. Dr. Lee is currently an Assistant Professor at Brown.

2002- 2003 Robert Miranda Jr. received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Oklahoma State University and respecialized in biological psychology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. His research interests center on addiction, developmental psychopathology, and affective neuroscience. His recent work has examined individual differences in emotional reactivity among individuals comorbid alcohol dependence and antisocial personality disorder and in young adults with a family history of alcoholism. Dr. Miranda is currently an Assistant Professor at Brown University.

2001 - 2003 Christianne Esposito-Smythers received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2000. Her graduate research focused on examining the relative importance of psychiatric diagnoses and psychosocial factors to the prediction of adolescent suicidal ideation. As a postdoctoral fellow at the CAAS, she plans to combine her research interest in adolescent suicide with substance abuse. She is most interested in developing cognitive behavioral treatments for adolescent substance abusers with co-occurring suicidality. Dr. Esposito-Smythers is currently an Assistant Professor at George Mason University.

2001-2002 Johanna Lewis Esquerre received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Florida in 2001. Her dissertation "Development and Validation of an Adolescent Smoking Consequences Questionnaire" focused on the measurement of smoking expectancies among both smoking and non-smoking adolescents. Her interests include the measurement of nicotine dependence among adolescents, cognitive processes involved in adolescent smoking initiation, and intervention approaches in adolescent substance use. Dr. Lewis Esquerre also has more broad interests in the area of child health policy. Dr. Lewis Esquerre is currently in private practice at The Counseling Center, Nashua, NH.

2001 - 2004 Todd Moore received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2001. His previous research included examining the attributions of verbally aggressive men in response to female partner behavior. His dissertation explored the role of men's adherence to masculinity in influencing their physiological and aggressive coping responses to female partner behavior that challenged masculinity. As a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Alcohol and Addictions Studies, he plans to integrate his interests in partner violence and alcohol/Illicit substance use and abuse by examining the impact of techniques to reduce alcohol and Illicit Substance use and their subsequent impact on partner violence. He also plans to examine the role of masculinity in mediating the relationship between substance use and partner violence. Dr. Moore is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee. 

2000 - 2001 Denise Bury-Maynard received her Ph.D. in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis where she was an NIAAA pre-doctoral fellow. Her areas of interest and expertise are in the areas of cost-effectiveness analysis and outcomes research with a particular emphasis on quality of life outcomes. She plans to continue her work on refining a utility index for substance abuse (QALY methodology) and to compare and contrast quality of life outcomes using economic versus psychometric approaches. Dr. Bury-Maynard is currently an Independent Consultant working in Health outcomes and health services research.

2000-2003 Karen Friend received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland in 1997. She is a Senior Research Scientist and Associate Center Director at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. In addition, she is an Adjunct Associate Professor and on the Training Faculty at CAAS. Her career spans the roles of research in substance abuse and behavioral health prevention and treatment, trainer/teacher/mentor, and evaluator. Her areas of research include tobacco, alcohol and other substance abuse, obesity and health services/access to treatment/treatment quality.

2000-2003 Jennifer Read received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Rhode Island in May of 2000. Her primary research interest is the identification of cognitive, affective, and social factors that contribute to heavy drinking and associated consequences among young adults (especially college students). Dr. Read has a particular interest in the association between trauma and posttraumatic stress and substance misuse in this population. She also has conducted work on the measurement of problematic alcohol use in college students. She is currently a Professor at the University of Buffalo, (SUNY).

2000-2002 Holly Sindelar received her PhD in School Psychology from the University of Rhode Island in 2000. She will be working with Dr. Paul Malloy to develop a program of research on the impact of adolescent substance abuse on neurocognitive development. Her interests include adolescent alcohol and other substance abuse and neuropsychological assessment. Dr. Sindelar is currently at Rhode Island Hospital as a Staff Psychologist.


1999-2003 Irene Glasser received her Ph.D. in anthropology in 1986 from the University of Connecticut. As a medical anthropologist she has been teaching anthropology and conducting research on topics including homlessness, soup kitchens, and alcohol, drug and tobacco use among homeless individuals. Currently she is an Adjunct Lecturer in the Anthropology Department at Brown University and a Research Associate at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University. She is also evaluating the Housing First Model for homeless individuals with co-occurring mental illness and addictions through the Riverwood Mental Health Center. Dr. Glasser is working on a feasibility study of introducing Nicotine Anonymous to homeless communities in collaboration with the National Health Care for the Homeless Council. Glasser is the author of the books More Than Bread: Ethnography of a Soup Kitchen (University of Alabama Press 1988), Homelessness in Global Perspective (McMillan 1994), Braving the Street: The Anthropology of Homelessness (Berghahn Books 1999) and Anthropology of Addictions and Recovery (Waveland Press 2012).

1999-2001 Pamela Block received her Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from Duke University in 1997. Her dissertation "Biology, Culture and Cognitive Disability: Twentieth Century Professional Discourse in Brazil and the United States" addressed the influence of cultural beliefs and professional theories on disability policy and treatment. At CAAS she studied the prevalence and consequences of alcohol and substance use in people with disabilities and the availability of intervention and treatment opportunities for this population. She has been funded by NIH, NIDRR, and NMSS for her disability studies research and scholarship. She is now Associate Dean for Research in the School of Health Technology and Management at Stony Brook University and Director of the Disability Studies Track of the Doctoral Health Program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. She is a past president of the Society for Disability Studies, and is a Fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology.

1999 - 2002 Lynn Hall received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Temple University in 1998. She is interested in the extent to which various environmental factors interact in the etiology of substance abuse in gay, lesbian and transgendered communities. She is also interested in the efficacy of different forms of intervention, and treatment programs, specifically the examining the differences between gay specific treatment programs and programs which do not take sexual orientation into account.

1999 - 2001 Charles Neighbors received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Rutgers University in 1999. Dr. Neighbors will be developing a program of research on cost-effectiveness methods in clinical trials. He also plans to continue work on social networks' influence on substance use and targeting concurrent health-risk behaviors with treatment for alcoholism.

1999-2000 Jennifer Tidey received her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Tufts University in 1995 and completed post-graduate training at Harvard University and the University of Vermont before coming to Brown as a post-doc from 1999-2000. She joined the Brown faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2000. She is currently an Associate Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown Medical School and the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Brown University's School of Public Health. At CAAS, she is a member of the core and training faculty, the Director of the CAAS Addictive Behaviors Laboratory and an Associate Director of the CAAS NIDA T32 Post-doctoral Training program. Her primary research area is the identification of biological and environmental factors that contribute to the high rates of cigarette smoking among people with serious mental illness, to inform treatment and regulatory decisions concerning smoking in this high-risk group.

1998 - 2001 Selene Varney received her Psy.D. in clinical psychology from Indiana State University, Terre Haute in 1998. Dr. Varney primary interest is in coping skills used by adults to maintain sobriety and in quality of life issues during sobriety.

1998 - 2000 Lynda Stein received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Kent State University in 1998. Dr. Stein is interested in early intervention programs for youth and young adults, especially youths and adults involved in the legal system. She is also interested in methodological issues such as sample bias and the influence of biased response sets during substance abuse evaluations. Dr. Stein is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Brown University.

1998 - 2000 Laura Stroud received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Yale University in 1999. She is currently pursuing research examining the interactions of stress, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis and both alcohol and smoking. She is particularly interested in HPA reactivity, gender, and prenatal factors as markers for vulnerability to and nicotine dependence. She also has a line of research examining sex differences in physiological responses to stress. Dr. Stroud is currently an Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior Research at Brown University.

1998-2000 Gregory Stuart received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Indiana University, Bloomington in 1998. Dr. Stuart’s program of research has a particular emphasis on the role of substance use and abuse in intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization. His work addresses a broad spectrum of factors that are relevant to the etiology, classification, assessment, prevention, maintenance, and treatment of intimate partner violence. His work examines the impact of substance abuse treatment on the prevalence and frequency of intimate partner violence, as well as the effects of substance abuse treatment on other domains of relationship and family functioning. He is also interested in discovering genetic predictors of intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and treatment outcome. His work focuses on family violence throughout the lifespan, including child abuse, dating aggression, and intimate partner violence. Dr. Stuart is currently a Professor at the University of Tennessee and an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

1998-2000 Sean Hagberg received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from SUNY Buffalo in 1998. Dr. Hagberg focused on development of non-linear modeling techniques for addressing a variety of health issues.  Post-CAAS, Dr. Hagberg pursued those interesting in clinically-applicable therapeutics in the private sector in a series of medical technology start-ups.  He has served as founding Chief Sciences Officer for several ventures, private and public.  He is currently investigating non-invasive modalities to improve neuroplasticity in TBI, concussion and cognition as the CSO of Rio Grande Neurosciences and Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery, University of New Mexico.

1997 - 2000 Mitchell Karno received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1997. Dr. Karno's primary interest was identifying patient attributes that moderate the effectiveness of various treatments for alcoholism. He was supervised by Richard Longabaugh. Dr. Karno is currently an Assistant Professor at Brown University in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. He is beginning a 3-year NIAAA-funded study of the in-session process of alcohol treatment.

1997-2000 Tracy O'Leary Tevyaw received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York in 1997 and completed clinical internship at the Brown University Clinical Psychology Internship Consortium. Dr. Tevyaw is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, and Associate Chief Psychologist at the Providence VA Medical Center. She is the primary clinical supervisor of the VA Primary Care rotation in the Brown University Clinical Psychology Internship’s Behavioral Medicine Track. Dr. Tevyaw's primary clinical research areas include (1) developing brief interventions and enhancing existing treatments for substance use problems, and (2) enhancing integrated primary care through shared medical appointments.

 

1998-1999 Tammy Chung received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1998.  Dr. Chung worked with Dr. Suzanne Colby on projects that involved screening adolescents for problem drinking in a pediatric emergency department, and examining how developmental issues affect the diagnosis of substance use disorders in adolescents. Dr. Chung co-guest edited a special issue of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors (published: June 2013) on “Neuroimaging mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for addictive behaviors.” Dr. Chung is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

1997-1999 Nancy Barnett received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Washington in 1997 and is currently an Associate Professor of Behavioral & Social Sciences at Brown. Her primary area of research interest is the assessment of hazardous alcohol use among adolescents and young adults, and the use of brief interventions to reduce the harm associated with alcohol use in youth. Much of her research has included technological innovations, including web-based and computer-based assessment approaches and computer-based interventions. She has conducted novel clinical research using an alcohol biosensor and is developing data processing software that will facilitate the adoption of these sensors by new users. Recent research areas include investigating the influence of peer social networks among college students using social network analysis, and investigating mechanisms of the relationship between alcohol use and sex risk behavior using ecological momentary assessment.

1997-1999 Anthony Floyd received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University in 1997. His primary interest is in substance abuse treatment outcomes and implementation of cost-effective treatment programs. Dr. Floyd studied the impact of treatment duration, self-help groups, and maintenance care services on outcomes. Dr. Floyd worked with Dr. Norman Hoffmann. He holds a research associate appointment with Brown University.

1994-1998 Dena Davidson received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. During her CAAS fellowship, she worked with Dr. Robert Swift on basic human laboratory research to examine the effects of medications for lowering alcohol consumption and several clinical trials to test the efficacy of new medications for changing drinking behavior. Dr. Davidson was the recipient of a K award from NIAAA titled ”Methods for Assessing Methods for Assessing Medications to Lower ETOH Intake.” She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Texas A&M Health Science Center, and the Director of Research at the Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans in Waco, Texas.


1995-1998 Aruna Gogineni received her Ph.D. in Social Work from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Her research interests involve the impact of psychosocial environment on alcohol treatment outcomes; the role of family history in the etiology of alcohol problems; and brief/early interventions for substance abusing populations. Dr. Gogineni worked with Drs. Longabaugh and Stout. She has received a Research Excellence Award from the Center to examine how gender differences in parental alcoholism affect alcoholism among adult female daughters and granted an R03 by NIAAA to conduct a further study in this area.

 

1995-1998 Kent Hutchison received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Oklahoma State University and completed his internship at Brown. His research is on the behavioral pharmacology of addiction, specifically with regard to alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Dr. Hutchison worked with Drs. Rohsenow, Monti, Swift, and Niaura. He received a FIRST award to integrate the startle reflex paradigm into a comprehensive laboratory approach that is designed to investigate the biological and cognitivemechanisms that underlie the acquisition and expression of addictive behaviors. He accepted a position as Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado.

1996-1998 Kathleen Morrow received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Western Michigan University. Her primary area of research interest includes the study of alcohol and drug-related behaviors and their association with HIV/STD infection. Her focus at the Center involved evaluating intervention strategies which examine how alcohol and drug use effects an individual's decision to engage in safer sex and needle-sharing behaviors and how other factors, (e.g., age, relationship status, psychiatric history) act as covariants in that process. She is currently working on an HIV/STD prevention program for young men leaving prison, a population that faces numerous drug using and drug trading/trafficking behaviors. She is also working on a smoking cessation intervention for HIV+ individuals, acceptability research involving vaginal microbicides for the prevention of HIV/STD infections, and an HIV/STD prevention program for substance abusing women. Dr. Morrow is currently an Associate Professor of Psychiatry& Human Behavior (Research) at Brown University.

1996-1998 Mark Wood received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Missouri. His research interests are in three interrelated areas: (a) the psychosocial determinants and correlates of alcohol use/misuse and other health-related behaviors; (b) the design and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs targeting substance abuse and other socially problematic behaviors; and (c) alcohol-related aggressive behavior. Dr. Wood is the principal investigator on two recently funded grants. The first is a FIRST award from NIAAA to determine whether individualized normative feedback and alcohol expectancy challenges are effective in reducing alcohol abuse among college students. The second grant is from the Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation and is designed to examine the role of alcohol expectancies and social influences factors in alcohol use and abuse during the early college years. Dr. Wood is currently a Professor of Psychology at the University of Rhode Island and an Adjunct Professor of Behavioral & Social Sciences at Brown.

1995-1997 Susan Ramsey received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Indiana University. While at the Center her primary areas of interest were brief alcohol interventions in primary care settings and the impact of comorbidity on substance abuse treatment. Dr. Ramsey worked with Drs. Longabaugh, Stout and Rick Brown. She has accepted a position as investigator at Brown University and project director at Butler Hospital. The project she is directing will examine the efficacy of adding cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression, relative to relaxation training, to a standard partial hospital alcohol treatment for alcohol dependent patients with concomitant depressive symptoms. This is an NIAAA-funded project. Dr. Ramsey is currently an Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior (Research) at Brown University.

1994-1997 Tibor Palfai received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Yale University and completed his internship at Brown. During his fellowship he studied the influence of cognitive strategies on cue reactivity using the alcohol cue exposure paradigm. His primary interests were information processing mechanisms underlying addictive behaviors and understanding how treatments directed at different mechanisms of change (e.g., biological, cognitive, motivational) may be optimally integrated. Dr. Palfai worked with Dr. Monti and Rohsenow. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Boston University.

1995-1997 David Kalman received his Ph.D. in social work from Simmons College. His primary research interests are in smoking cessation and smoking and alcohol interactions. As a postdoctoral fellow, Dr. Kalman worked primarily with Dr. Monti. Following his postdoctoral training, Dr. Kalmanwas the Director of Substance Abuse Treatment Services for a large multi-site agency north of Boston. Dr. Kalman recently began work on a FIRST Award project involving smoking cessation treatment for recovering alcoholics who are heavy smokers.

1995-1997 Thaddeus Herzog received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard University. While at the Center he worked with Dr. Abrams studying the stages and processes of change model. Dr. Herzog is now a post-doctoral fellow at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and a visiting assistant professor at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida.

1994-1997 Walter Adams received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Michigan State University in 1988. A central focus of his research looks at the relationship between dietary tryptophan and alcohol consumption for which he received an R03 from NIAAA. This is the focus of study for a CAAS research excellence award he received. Secondary interests, stemming from his training in anthropology, are ethnicity and cultural influences on drinking and drug use. Dr. Adams worked with Drs. Swift and Love.

1994-1996 - Kenneth E. Hart received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology/Behavioral Medicine from the University of Houston in 1986. Prior to coming to the Center, Dr. Hart was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Hofstra University, Long Island, New York. As an applied Social Psychologist interested in clinical health psychology, most of his research focused on vulnerability-stress models of health risk (e.g., stress, personality, social support, coping). Dr. Hart worked with Dr. Longabaugh. Upon leaving the Center, he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Wales (Britain), and subsequently relocated to England, where he is an Assistant Professor at the University of Leeds, about two hours north of London. Currently, Ken is a PI on a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, which provides support for a 2 year patient-treatment matching study examining anger and forgiveness among recovering alcoholic members of Alcoholics Anonymous. He is also a co-PI on a 2 year multi-site grant from the Alcohol Education Research Council to examine underage use of alcohol and other drugs of abuse, and illegal alcohol purchasing patterns by adolescents in Britain. Findings from this research are informing policy decisions of the British Government regarding the purchasing and sales of alcohol to young people.

1994-1996 - Barry Goetz received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. His interests are in theories of the state, policy implementation, bureaucracy and law enforcement. His current research is on community policing as an alcohol and drug enforcement and harm reduction measure. He has accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Dayton. Dr. Goetz is looking at the community policing-drug policy issue supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The research includes a national survey and case studies in four cities, including Norfolk, Baltimore, San Francisco and Lansing, MI. Dr. Goetz was supervised by Dr. Lewis.

1994-1996 - Maureen Norton Hawk received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Northeastern University. She studied the impact of the interface of law and medicine on substance abuse treatment and how that interface is socially determined. She examined the treatment needs of pregnant addicted women who do not avail themselves of medical services. Dr. Norton Hawk worked with Dr. Lewis. Dr. Hawk is currently an Assistant Professor at Suffolk University. She is working on a joint project with the Boston Police Department examining the interrelationship between drugs and female street prostitution, conducting a needs assessment of the children of incarcerated females, and collaborating on a comparison of rural vs. urban female detainees. Her work has also expanded into the international sphere through her research with colleagues in Slovakia and Ukraine.

1993-1996 - Leslie Chernen received her Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research in 1988. Prior to her arrival at Brown Dr. Chernen was an Assistant Clinical Professor in Psychiatry at the Health Science Center, Brooklyn, in the Sate University of New York. Dr. Chernen conducted research in the area of alcohol-related birth defects and fetal alcohol syndrome babies and their mothers. She received an R03 award from NIAAA for a study entitled Predicting Fetal Alcohol Effects Via Biobehavioral Risk, and a B/Start award from NIDA entitled Cocaine/Alcohol Exposure and Infant Outcome. Dr. Chernen worked under the supervision of Drs. Lester, Lipsitt and Love. She currently holds a position with the Rhode Island Public Health Foundation.

1993-1995 - James Hittner received his Ph.D. from Hofstra University in 1993 in Clinical and School Psychology. His research focused on the relationship between outcome expectancies and alcohol use onset and maintenance, the association between expectancies and mood, and the role of cognitive appraisal in stress-related drinking. Dr. Hittner worked with Drs. Richard Brown, Damaris Rohsenow, and Amy Rubin. In 1995 he received the Sharon Chauncey Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award. Following his Post-Doc he moved to Charleston, South Carolina, where he presently is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the College of Charleston.

1993-1995 - Oleg Kuznetsov received his M.D. from the Medical Institute in Lvov, UkSSR in 1974 and did his psychiatric residency at Zolochevs Regional Hospital in UkSSR. In 1975 he received a Scientific Certificate from the Main Psychiatry Institute of USSR Academy of Sciences at Moscow. Prior to his affiliation at Brown he worked as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Substance Abuse at the Lvov Medical Institute for Advanced Education for Physicians (UkSSR) where he performed research in the field of substance abuse and affective disorders. While at Brown, Dr. Kuznetsov worked with Dr. Swift at Roger Williams Medical Center conducting studies of the effect of several medications, such as Naltrexone, Ondansetron and Idazoxan, on acute alcohol intoxication in humans. He has also performed the investigation on calibrating a new experimental device - Transdermal Alcohol Sensor/Recorder. In 1994-95 he conducted a self-designed pilot study for pharmacokinetical measures of alcohol catabolism features in alcoholic humans supported by the Department of Psychiatry at Roger Williams Hospital. As a result, the U.S. Patent No. 5,783,449 is recently granted on his elaboration on quantification of alcohol breakdown activity in humans in vivo.

1993-1995 - Kevin Lourie received his Ph.D. in Medical and Cultural Anthropology from Brown University in 1990. Prior to his admission to the post-doctoral training program he was a lecturer at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1990-1993) and the Bar-Ilan University School of Social Work (1992). While at the Center, Dr. Lourie focused on the interrelationships between alcohol, drug, and sex behaviors and the implementation of HIV prevention programs for high risk urban populations. He designed and implemented an HIV-prevention program for young adolescent mothers at Rhode Island Hospital's Teen Tot Clinic. He also worked with Dr. Larry K. Brown to implement and evaluate an HIV prevention program for psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents and assisted Dr. Timothy Flanigan in the evaluation of a prison release follow-up program for HIV-positive women at Rhode Island's correctional facility. He subsequently completed a two-year, NIMH-funded training fellowship in the Child and Family Psychiatry Division of Brown University, where he is currently a faculty Investigator. Dr. Lourie and Dr. Brown recently received a four-year grant funded by SAMHSA to design and test a brief HIV prevention program for patients in the Adolescent Health Clinic.

1992-1995 - David Duncan Dr. P.H., received the Doctor of Public Health degree in 1976 from the University of Texas health Science Center at Houston. Immediately prior to coming to Brown he was consultant epidemiologist for the Illinois Primary Health Care Association, working with rural and migrant health centers. Before that he was Professor of Health Education and Coordinator of the Community Health Program at Southern Illinois University. While at the Center he developed measures for use in drug policy analysis, examined harm reduction as a policy option, studied the prevalence of substance abuse among the elderly, and examined the acceptability of naltrexone in treatment of alcoholism. Since completing his post-doc he has served as Senior Public Health Epidemiologist with the Rhode Island Department of Health and for two years operated his own private consulting firm --Duncan and Associates. He is now Senior Study Director of the substance abuse division of Westat Corporation, a statistical consulting firm in Rockville, Maryland, where his clients include the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. He holds a faculty appointment as Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Health at Brown and as Professor of Psychology at Capella University.

1992-1995 - P. Allison Minugh received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Rhode Island in 1992. Dr. Minugh studied gender roles and their relationship to alcohol use. While she was a post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Minugh worked with Dr. Longabaugh and collaborated with him in the development of an NIAAA-funded study of brief intervention for alcohol positive injured patients in the Emergency Department for which she is currently a Co-Investigator. She received a CAAS research excellence award to develop a brief intervention for women with alcohol problems. Dr. Minugh left the Center to accept a faculty position at Harvard Medical School where she studied substance abuse treatment needs with an emphasis on adolescent substance abuse and their treatment needs. She also served as the evaluator of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's national needs assessment program. She is presently working at her own consulting firm, DATACORP, which is based in Providence, Rhode Island.

1992-1995 - Eric Wagner received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1992 from the University of Pittsburgh. During his tenure at the Center, he developed a grant proposal evaluating the effectiveness of a school-based intervention for alcohol use problems among teenagers. This grant eventually was funded by NIAAA as an R01. He since has served as is principal investigator (PI) or co-principal investigator (Co-PI) on ten NIH-funded grants. Currently, he is the Miami-site PI on a multisite NIAAA-funded R01 grant that is testing a developmentally sensitive, school-based, group intervention for preventing underage drinking problems. He is also the Co-PI on a NIDA-funded R01 grant that investigates brief school-based motivational interviewing for Native American adolescents using alcohol and other drugs. Additionally, Dr. Wagner is a Licensed Psychologist and a board member of the Research Society on Alcoholism. Dr. Wagner is a Professor in the Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work at Florida International University, where he directs the Community-Based Intervention Research Group.

1992-1994 - Clara Bradizza received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1992 from SUNY - Binghamton, NY and completed a clinical psychology internship at Brown University. As a post-doctoral Fellow, Dr. Bradizza studied exposure to negative emotional cues during alcohol cue exposure, and published a theoretical paper on cognitions and cue exposure. Her primary focus was on the role of emotions in drinking urges and relapse. She was supervised by Drs. Maisto and Longabaugh. Dr. Bradizza is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the Research Institute on Addictions in Buffalo, NY. Although she has continued her interests in alcohol and drug cue exposure, her primary area of interest is coping skills assessment and treatment of individuals dually-diagnosed with a drug disorder and a serious mental illness. She has received a 5-year Mentored Research Scientist Development Award from NIDA to fund her work in this area.

1992-1994 - Pamela Brown received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1992 at Clark University, MA. While at the Center she studied the interrelationship of substance abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women. Dr. Brown worked under the supervision of Dr. Stout. She received a CAAS research excellence award in preparation for a first grant submission, PTSD and substance abuse relapse, which was awarded by NIAAA for five years, starting in 1995. She currently holds a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Brown University.

1992-1994 - Leslie Young received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1992 from Boston University. While at the Center as a post-doctoral Fellow she focused on the role of childhood trauma in substance abusers. Dr. Young worked under the supervision of Drs. Longabaugh and Rice. Dr. Young is now Director of Behavioral Health on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona where she is coordinating the departments research efforts.

1991-1993 Paul Stasiewicz received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at SUNY - Binghamton in 1989. During his fellowship years he worked with Drs. Monti, Rohsenow, and Maisto. His work is focused on the application of basic behavioral research to the development of new clinical interventions. Specific interests include alcohol craving and the connection between negative emotional states and substance use. He is a senior research scientist and the Director of the Clinical Research Center, the outpatient alcohol treatment clinic at the Research Institute on Addictions in Buffalo, NY.

1991-1993 - Stephen Cabral received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Brown University in 1978. While at the Center he worked with Drs. John Stevenson and Pat Clifford in an ethnographic study of AIDS related risk behaviors among minority IV drug users and their sexual partners in New Bedford, MA and Pawtucket, RI. Dr. Cabral also collaborated with Drs. Lewis and Wagner on the Global Cocaine Survey for WHO. Dr. Cabral teaches courses in Maritime Anthropology and Drugs in Society and Culture at URI and UMass-Dartmouth.

1991-1993 Mark Myers received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1991 from the University of California, San Diego and completed a clinical psychology internship at Brown. During his time as a post-doctoral Fellow at the Center, Dr. Myers initiated studies of adolescent substance abuse, and was awarded a FIRST award grant from NIDA to study adolescent substance abusers with conduct disorders. He also collaborated in successful grant submissions with other investigators at the Center. He is currently a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, and a staff psychologist at the V.A. San Diego Healthcare System. His research focuses on youth tobacco and other drug use and tobacco cessation and mental illness.

1990-1992 - Abdullah Mehdipour received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Western Michigan University in 1985. He is currently president of New Insights and founder and coordinator of Substance Abuse Certificate Program at the University of Southern Colorado and teaches at that university. He has been serving as chairperson of City of Colorado Springs/El Paso County Task Force on Alcohol and other Drugs for the past three years.

1990-1992 - Amy Rubin received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from SUNY Buffalo in 1990. During her fellowship years she worked with Dr. Longabaugh. She is currently a co-principal investigator working with Dr. Stout on an NIAAA-funded grant, Extended Case Monitoring for Alcoholics: Health Costs. The project looks at the effectiveness of low cost, long-term intervention to prevent or mitigate relapse in treated alcohol abusers. She is an Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown.

1990-1991 David Solomon, M.D. received his M.D. degree at the Boston University School of Medicine in 1986. He worked with Dr. Malloy during his fellowship looking at cognitive impairment and the interaction of alcohol and head injury. Dr. Solomon is now Deputy Editor for Psychiatry at UpToDate, a web based, electronic medical library, and serves as an attending physician at Rhode Island Hospital and a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University.

1990-1991 Suzy Bird Gulliver received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Vermont in 1990. During her post-doctoral training she worked with Drs. Monti and Rohsenow. Dr. Gullivers addiction research is in the areas of smoking, alcohol treatment outcome and broad spectrum treatment for alcoholism.

1989-1991 Patrick R. Clifford, Ph.D. received his degree in Community Health Science from the University of Texas School of Public Health in 1983. Dr. Clifford is currently Professor and Associate Dean for Research at Rutgers University School of Public Health. His research interests are in the following areas: methodological factors affecting clinical outcomes (e.g., assessment reactivity effects); mechanisms of behavior change underlying alcohol treatments/interventions; and alcohol treatment/intervention outcomes.

1989-1991 Craig Love, Ph.D.received his degree in Educational Psychology from Temple University in 1978. During his fellowship, he worked with Dr. Longabaugh on treatment matching. Dr. Love continues at Brown as a Research Associate in the Department of Community Health and as a private consultant, working with EMT Associates, an evaluation firm based in Sacramento, California, HRC Associates, a Denver, Colorado based criminal justice evaluation agency, and the George Washington University Health Sciences Research Center. He is currently Principal Investigator on a Robert Wood Johnson funded evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of drug abuse treatment in prisons. Dr. Love is also Senior Evaluator on a national cross-site evaluation of 50 high risk youth prevention projects; Associate Director of a CSAT funded evaluation of an integrated treatment network in Denver; Co-Principal Investigator on a NIDA funded randomized clinical trials study of the cost-effectiveness of aftercare in traditional substance abuse treatment settings and has recently completed a 5 year, CSAP funded, high risk urban Native American substance abuse prevention project. Dr. Love's research projects include substance abuse treatment and prevention among urban and rural Native American communities as well as substance abuse treatment issues in the criminal justice system, particularly in prisons and courts. His project with George Washington University includes an innovative application of a drug court model in the non-criminal family dependency court. This innovation, called family drug court, involves the provision of case management and treatment access to parents who face custody issues regarding their children.

1989-1991 Christopher Martin, PhD. is a tenured Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. His primary interests are in the nosology and clinical course of alcohol and substance use disorders during adolescence and young adulthood. He has been the principal investigator on a number of NIAAA grants, including a FIRST Award, several R01 awards, a K02 award, and a K24 award. He has served as a Co-Director of a T32 postdoctoral training program and ha mentored a number of pre- and post-doctoral students. He has been a member of NIAAA's AA3 Review Committee, and has participated in numerous NIAAA activities, including the Institute's Underage Drinking Initiative. He has served as an associate and consulting editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

1989-1991 Rock L Clapper, PhD left Brown University for Silicon Valley in 1994, which coincided with his first look at an Internet applicaiton called a 'browser'. He knew that his doctorate in applied social psychology was a perfect background for creating web-based consumer and business environments. Rock holds a BS in Psychology from Arizona State University, a Masters and Doctorate in Applied Social Psycholgy from the University of Houston, as well as being an alumnus of Stanford University's Graduate School of Business Executive Education Program. He has been the CEO of several successful Internet and software companies in Silicon Valley. Since the early part of the last decade he has been an investor, mentor and advisor to early stage companies, and is a member of the Silicon Valley investment group, Band of Angels.

1988-1991 - Ronald Murphy, Ph.D. received his degree in Clinical Psychology from SUNY Binghamton in 1988. While at the Center he worked with Drs. Maisto, McKay, Lipsitt, and Logue on several projects. Dr. Murphy is now doing research at the National Center for PTSD in the Menlo Park, California VA Hospital and has a FIRST award to continue his research.

1988-1990 - Margaret Goldberg, Ph.D. received her degree in Anthropology from the University of Illinois in 1985. Subsequent to completion of the program, she accepted a position with the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Center at McLean Hospital, collaborating on studies of female alcoholics.

1988-1990 - James McKay, Ph.D. received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Harvard University in 1987. During his fellowship, he worked with Drs. Maisto and Longabaugh. Dr. McKay is now working as an investigator at the Addiction Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where he holds an appointment as Assistant Professor. Dr. McKay is principal investigator for several research grants on substance abuse.

1988-1990 - Paul Schnur, Ph.D. received his degree in Experimental Psychology from Indiana University in 1970. While at the Center he worked at Roger Williams Hospital with Dr. Robert Swift, and at the Brown University Department of Psychology with Dr. Michael Walker. Dr. Schnur is now Chair and Professor of Psychology at Indiana University South Bend. His research is on the cognitive consequences of drug craving.

1988-1989 - Hilton Parmentier, M.D. received his degree from Ross University in 1984. While at the Center he worked in the VA Medical Center, under the supervision of Dr. Michael Liepman. Dr. Parmentier completed his psychiatric residency training at the Medical College of WI. He is the medical director of Marathon of R.I., Inc.

1988-1989 - Alan Shein, M.D. received his degree in Radiology from the Medical College of PA in 1983. His supervisor during his fellowship at Brown was Dr. Alan Wartenberg. He currently holds the position of Director of Medical Services at Laurelwood Hospital in Ohio.

1988-1989 - Cynthia Cimino, Ph.D. received her degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Florida in 1988. During her post-doctoral training, she worked with Dr. Malloy. She is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Neurology, College of Medicine at the University of South Florida where she continues her research.

1988-1989 - Michael Wolfson, M.D., M.P.H. received his degree in Occupational Medicine from SUNY College of Medicine - Syracuse in 1981. During his fellowship at the Center, he worked with Drs. Alan Wartenberg and Michael Liepman. Dr. Wolfson accepted a staff position in Syracuse, New York.

1987-1990 - Linda Parker, Ph.D. was accepted into our program as our first pre-doctoral trainee. She was an Anthropology student at Brown and received her Ph.D. in 1989. She continued her training as a post-doctoral Fellow for a third year. While at the Center she worked under the direction of Drs. Heath and Longabaugh. She is currently an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at Louisiana State University-Eunice, where she is also Director of Grants and Assessment. She also works among the Koasati (Coushatta) Indians in Elton, LA.

1987-1989 - Susan Cunningham, Ph.D. received her degree in Sociology from the University of Maryland in 1986.At Brown, she worked under the supervision of Dr. Richard Longabaugh on drinking and work-related issues.  Since 1999, Dr. Cunningham has been Associate Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies at the College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA), where she is in charge of developing and supervising interdisciplinary academic programs.  She also teaches in the Sociology Department, most notably a course titled “Children and Violence,” which was a finalist in the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Call for Submissions regarding a Violence Studies Curriculum (1999).  Her research focuses primarily on factors related to child abuse in the family setting. 

1987-1989 - Perilou Goddard, Ph.D. came to Brown from Indiana University where she received her degree in Clinical Psychology in 1987. While at the Center she worked with Drs. Monti and Rohsenow at the VAMC. She is now an Associate Professor of Psychology at Northern Kentucky University, where she was chose as the 1999-2000 recipient of the Frank Sinton Milburn Outstanding Professor Award.

1987-1989 - Mary Ellin Logue, Ed.D. received her degree in Early Childhood Education from U. Mass, Amherst in 1984. She worked at the Child Study Center under the supervision of Drs. Lipsitt and Longabaugh. Dr. Logue is currently a Senior Research Associate at RMC Research in Portsmouth NH and is working on two projects: a training contract for the National Head Start Bureau and U.S. Department of Education-funded project supporting state parent resource centers.

1987-1989 - Anthony V. Rubonis, Ph.D. received his degree in Clinical Psychology and Social Psychology from Vanderbilt University in 1987. He carried out his post-doctoral training working collaboratively with Drs. Monti and Rohsenow. He is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Union College (Schenectady, New York) where he continues his research investigating various links between moods and addictive behavior.

1987-1989 - Loretta Young Silvia, Ph.D. received her degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Texas Tech in 1987. While at the Center she worked in the Providence VA system, under the joint supervision of Drs. Liepman and Nirenberg. Dr. Silvia then went on to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina where she worked on developing a substance abuse prevention program for parents of elementary school children. Dr. Silvia passed away in 2006. The Loretta Y. Silvia Teaching Award, which was begun in 2006, is presented each year to a faculty member at Wake Forest who teaches by example and possesses clinical excellence, empathy, courage and compassion. She was named a Distinguished Alumni by the College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University.